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Biography

Kellogg School of Management
DeWitt W. Buchanan, Jr., Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations, Professor of Management & Organizations

Jeanne Brett is the DeWitt W. Buchanan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations.

Professor Brett's research is in the areas of cross cultural negotiations, the resolution of disputes, and the performance of multicultural teams.  Her current research investigates culture and negotiation strategies.  She is also studying negotiating teams and technological solutions to their myriad logistical problems. She is the author of numerous journal articles, negotiations teaching materials, and two award winning books: Getting Disputes Resolved with William Ury and Stephen Goldberg and the single authored Negotiating Globally. She initiated Kellogg's MBA courses in negotiations in 1981 and in cross-cultural negotiations in 1994.  She has received numerous career awards: the David L. Bradford Outstanding Educator Award in Organizational Behavior; the Academy of Management Outstanding Educator Award; the Clarence L. Ver Steeg Graduate Faculty Award, and the International Association for Conflict Management Lifetime Achievement Award.

Areas of Expertise Cross-cultural Negotiations
Dispute Resolution
Negotiations
Multicultural Teams

Education PhD, 1972, Industrial and Organizational Psychology, University of Illinois

AM, 1969, University of Illinois

BA, 1967, Southern Methodist University

Academic Positions Director, Dispute Resolution Research Center, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 1989-present

DeWitt W. Buchanan, Jr. Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations, Dispute Resolution Research Center, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 1989-present

Exchange Professor Sciences Po, L'Institut d'etudes politiques (IEP) de Paris, 2006-2006

Department Chair, Management & Organizations, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 1999-2001

Visiting Professor, Keio University, Yokohama Japan, 1998-1998

Institut d'Administration des Entreprises, Universite de Droit, d'Economie et des Sciences d'Aix-Marseille, 1990-1990

Professor of Organizational Behavior, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 1983-1989

Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 1976-1983

Assistant Professor of Organizational Psychology, University of Michigan, 1975-1976

Faculty Associate, Organizational Behavior Program, Insitute for Social Research, University of Michigan, 1975-1976

Assistant Professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 1972-1975

Honors and Awards Outstanding Paper 2012, International Journal of conflict Management

Best Paper, Negotiation and Conflict management Research

Best Paper 2011, International Association for Conflict Management

Outstanding Published Journal Article Award, International Association for Conflict Management, 2013

Best Paper 2012, Negotiation and Conflict Management Review, 2013

Outstanding Paper Award Winner at the Literati Network Awards for Excellence, International Journal of conflict Management, 2013

Carolyn Dexter Award Finalist for Implications of Honor and Dignity Culture for Negotiations: A Comparative Study of Middle Easterners and Americans, Academy of Management (with Soroush Aslani), 2013

Conflict Management Division of Academy of Management Most Influential Paper 2004-2009, 2012

International Association for Conflict Management Distinguished Best Applied Paper for Face First (with Roderick Swaab), 2009

International Association for Conflict Management Distinguished Career Award, 2009

The Clarence L. Ver Steeg Graduate Faculty Award, Kellogg School of Management, 2007

International Association for Conflict Management Best Paper in 2005 for the Negotiation Dance: Time, Culture, and Behavioral Sequences in Negotiation by Wendy Adair & Jeanne Brett, 2007

Academy of Management Outstanding Educator Award, Kellogg School of Management, 2003

International Association of Conflict Management Book Award for Negotiating Globally, 2002

Kellogg Alumni Choice Teaching Award for lasting academic contribution, Kellogg School of Management, 2001

Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, University of Illionis, 2001

Kellogg Alumni Professor of the Year Award, Kellogg School of Management, 2001

Part-Time MBA Program Professor of the Year Award, Kellogg School of Management, 1993

Editorial Positions Editorial Board Member, Journal of Applied Psychology, 2008-Present

Editorial Board Member, Negotiation and Conflict Management Review, 2006

Editorial Board Member, Negotiation and Conflict Management Research

Editorial Board Member, International Journal of Conflict Management

Editorial Board Member, Negotiation Journal

Editor in Chief, Dispute Resolution Reserach Center Teaching Materials

Education Academic Positions Honors and Awards Editorial Positions

Read about executive education

Cases

Brett, Jeanne. 1983. Grievance Meditation in the Coal Industry: A Field Experiment. Industrial and labor Relations Review. 37(1): 49-69.

This article describes an experiment in the mediation of grievances that recently took place during two six-month periods in four districts of the United Mine Workers of America. Eighty-nine percent of the 153 grievances taken to mediation during the experiment were resolved before arbitration. This success rate did not appear to be influenced by whether one or both parties had to consent to take a grievance to mediation, or by the identity of the mediator or the nature of the issue, although no discharge grievances were mediated in the experiment. Instead, the key to settlement appeared to be the parties' willingness to negotiate. Cost savings attributable to mediating instead of arbitrating the 153 cases were nearly $100,000, and the average grievance was resolved three months sooner in mediation than it would have been had it gone to arbitration. Most of the participants in the experiment had favorable attitudes toward the process, regardless of the outcome of their particular case.

Brett, Jeanne. 2007. Negotiating Globally: How to Negotiate Deals, Resolve Disputes, and Make Decisions across Cultural Boundaries. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2nd ed.

Negotiating Globally , 2007 Jossey Bass When it was first published in 2001, Negotiating Globally quickly became the basic reference for managers who needed to learn how to negotiate successfully across boundaries of national culture. This thoroughly revised and expanded second edition preserves the structure of the acclaimed first edition and improves upon it, making it even easier to learn how to navigate national culture when negotiating deals, resolving disputes, and making decisions in teams. Rather than offering country-specific protocol and customs, Negotiating Globally provides a general framework to help negotiators anticipate and manage cultural differences. This new edition incorporates the lessons of the latest research with new emphasis on executing a negotiation strategy and negotiating conflict in multicultural teams. The well received chapter on government at and around the table has been expanded and updated with new examples that span the globe. In this comprehensive resource, Jeanne M. Brett describes how to develop a negotiation planning document and shows how to execute the plan. She provides a model that explains how the cultural environment affects negotiators’ interests, priorities, and strategies. She provides benchmarks for distinguishing good deals from poor ones and good negotiators from poor ones. The book explains how resolving disputes is different from making deals and how negotiation strategy can be used in multi-cultural teams. Negotiating Globally challenges negotiators to expand their repertoire of strategies so that they will be able to close deals, resolve disputes, and get teams to make decisions regardless of the cultures represented at the table. This new edition includes a CD-ROM that contains illustrative case studies based on real global negotiations. There is, in addition, a complete online Instructor’s Guide with teaching notes, course outlines, and advice for what experiential negotiation exercises to use to teach the principles underlying each chapter located at www.wiley.com/college . The Author Jeanne M. Brett is the DeWitt W. Buchanan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, where she is also the director and a founding member of the Dispute Resolution Research Center. Brett is the also an author of the award-winning Getting Disputes Resolved: Designing Systems to Cut the Costs of Conflict . Brett has won many awards for her scholarship and teaching including most recently the International Association for conflict Management’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Brett, Jeanne, Katherine Nelson and Nicole Tilzer. 2009. Negotiating for Fertilizer. Case 5-409-753 (KEL434).

One Acre Fund (OAF) was founded by Andrew Youn in 2005 for the purpose of helping to solve the chronic hunger problem in Africa. The idea is to provide the resources (seed, fertilizer, and education) necessary for African farm families to feed themselves when their land holdings are one acre or less. The business model of OAF is that of a cooperative: OAF buys resources like seeds and fertilizer in bulk at reduced prices and distributes them to small farmers who otherwise could not afford them. This case concerns the negotiation that OAF’s manager of external relations and research, Moises Postigo, conducted to buy fertilizer in the last quarter of 2007. The case provides an opportunity for students to analyze a real-world deal-making negotiation in a developing economy. A number of aspects of the context of the negotiation and the negotiation process itself make for good class discussion. Postigo did a good job preparing for the negotiation, making the case one that emphasizes proper use of negotiation planning and sensitive understanding of the negotiation environment.

Some of the elements that make for good discussion include the following: OAF was a new organization, unknown to the five major providers of fertilizer in Kenya. The negotiations were entirely conducted by cell phone. Negotiations went through stages of request for a bid, discussion with multiple bidders, selection of a provider, and negotiation. There were multiple issues, including price delivery and form of payment. Postigo was negotiating in the shadow of the possibility that the Kenyan government would start selling subsidized fertilizer to small farmers.

Brett, Jeanne, Lauren Pilcher and Lara Christina Sell. 2011. A New Approach to China: Google and Censorship in the Chinese Market. Case 5-211-255 (KEL590).

The first across-the-table negotiation between Google and China concluded successfully in 2006, when Google received a license to establish a local domain (google.cn) targeted at Chinese Internet users and not subject to the “Great Firewall”. During these negotiations both Google and the Chinese government struggled to reach an outcome that would be acceptable to their constituents. Google was caught between pleasing its shareholders and preserving its reputation for free access to information, while China was balancing the desire for cutting-edge search technology and the concern that liberal access to information would undermine its political-economic model. In the end, the negotiation resulted in Google operating two domains in China: Google.com and Google.cn. On the .cn website, Google complied with Chinese legislation through self-censoring. Google’s search market share in China grew to about 36 percent at the end of 2009.
In early 2010, Google announced that its corporate infrastructure had been the target of a series of China-based cyber attacks and accused the Chinese government of attempting to further limit free speech on the web. These incidents led to a public conflict and private negotiations between Google and the Chinese government, which culminated in July 2010 when the Chinese government renewed the google.cn license knowing that Google was redirecting all Chinese customers search to its google.hk.com site This case concerns the changes in Google and the Chinese government’s environment that led to Google withdrawing services from google.cn and the Chinese government saving face by renewing the google.cn license.
Students will learn that across-the-table negotiations are often preceded by internal negotiations, based on conflicting interests within one party. The case is based on the publicly reported events surrounding two series of negotiations between the U.S. technology giant Google and the Chinese Government regarding Google’s license in China.

Brett, Jeanne and Christopher D Grogan. 2006. Google and the Government of China: A Case Study in Cross-Cultural Negotiations. Case 5-406-752 (KEL242).

This case is based on the negotiation between Google and the Chinese government to allow access by Chinese citizens to a high-speed Chinese version of the Google search engine. In order to reach agreement with the Chinese government, Google had to agree to allow the government to censor access to some sites turned up by Google’s search engine. In agreeing, Google compromised its open access policy. There were inquiries into the agreement by the U.S. Congress and some outcry from U.S. citizens.

The learning objectives of the case include:
(1) Learning how to analyze a negotiation from the perspectives of each of the parties when one party is a government and the other a private-sector organization. What motivates each party to come to the negotiation table and to reach an agreement? A subpoint here is the difference between short-term and longer-term interests.
(2) Addressing the difficulties of balancing business ethics and financial objectives. What does it mean to be ethical in a for-profit business environment? At what point do ethical considerations outweigh financial ones? How do you make those choices? Are there creative ways to get around ethical situations?
(3) Understanding the long-term effects of short-term actions. Was Google’s subsequent action to notify its Chinese users whenever their searches had been filtered, which apparently came as a surprise to the Chinese government, ethical? Wise? What are the long-term implications of causing a party to lose face?

Brett, Jeanne. 1983. Grievance Meditation in the Coal Industry: A Field Experiment. Industrial and labor Relations Review. 37(1): 49-69.

This article describes an experiment in the mediation of grievances that recently took place during two six-month periods in four districts of the United Mine Workers of America. Eighty-nine percent of the 153 grievances taken to mediation during the experiment were resolved before arbitration. This success rate did not appear to be influenced by whether one or both parties had to consent to take a grievance to mediation, or by the identity of the mediator or the nature of the issue, although no discharge grievances were mediated in the experiment. Instead, the key to settlement appeared to be the parties' willingness to negotiate. Cost savings attributable to mediating instead of arbitrating the 153 cases were nearly $100,000, and the average grievance was resolved three months sooner in mediation than it would have been had it gone to arbitration. Most of the participants in the experiment had favorable attitudes toward the process, regardless of the outcome of their particular case.

Brett, Jeanne. 2007. Negotiating Globally: How to Negotiate Deals, Resolve Disputes, and Make Decisions across Cultural Boundaries. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2nd ed.

Negotiating Globally , 2007 Jossey Bass When it was first published in 2001, Negotiating Globally quickly became the basic reference for managers who needed to learn how to negotiate successfully across boundaries of national culture. This thoroughly revised and expanded second edition preserves the structure of the acclaimed first edition and improves upon it, making it even easier to learn how to navigate national culture when negotiating deals, resolving disputes, and making decisions in teams. Rather than offering country-specific protocol and customs, Negotiating Globally provides a general framework to help negotiators anticipate and manage cultural differences. This new edition incorporates the lessons of the latest research with new emphasis on executing a negotiation strategy and negotiating conflict in multicultural teams. The well received chapter on government at and around the table has been expanded and updated with new examples that span the globe. In this comprehensive resource, Jeanne M. Brett describes how to develop a negotiation planning document and shows how to execute the plan. She provides a model that explains how the cultural environment affects negotiators’ interests, priorities, and strategies. She provides benchmarks for distinguishing good deals from poor ones and good negotiators from poor ones. The book explains how resolving disputes is different from making deals and how negotiation strategy can be used in multi-cultural teams. Negotiating Globally challenges negotiators to expand their repertoire of strategies so that they will be able to close deals, resolve disputes, and get teams to make decisions regardless of the cultures represented at the table. This new edition includes a CD-ROM that contains illustrative case studies based on real global negotiations. There is, in addition, a complete online Instructor’s Guide with teaching notes, course outlines, and advice for what experiential negotiation exercises to use to teach the principles underlying each chapter located at www.wiley.com/college . The Author Jeanne M. Brett is the DeWitt W. Buchanan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, where she is also the director and a founding member of the Dispute Resolution Research Center. Brett is the also an author of the award-winning Getting Disputes Resolved: Designing Systems to Cut the Costs of Conflict . Brett has won many awards for her scholarship and teaching including most recently the International Association for conflict Management’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Brett, Jeanne, Katherine Nelson and Nicole Tilzer. 2009. Negotiating for Fertilizer. Case 5-409-753 (KEL434).

One Acre Fund (OAF) was founded by Andrew Youn in 2005 for the purpose of helping to solve the chronic hunger problem in Africa. The idea is to provide the resources (seed, fertilizer, and education) necessary for African farm families to feed themselves when their land holdings are one acre or less. The business model of OAF is that of a cooperative: OAF buys resources like seeds and fertilizer in bulk at reduced prices and distributes them to small farmers who otherwise could not afford them. This case concerns the negotiation that OAF’s manager of external relations and research, Moises Postigo, conducted to buy fertilizer in the last quarter of 2007. The case provides an opportunity for students to analyze a real-world deal-making negotiation in a developing economy. A number of aspects of the context of the negotiation and the negotiation process itself make for good class discussion. Postigo did a good job preparing for the negotiation, making the case one that emphasizes proper use of negotiation planning and sensitive understanding of the negotiation environment.

Some of the elements that make for good discussion include the following: OAF was a new organization, unknown to the five major providers of fertilizer in Kenya. The negotiations were entirely conducted by cell phone. Negotiations went through stages of request for a bid, discussion with multiple bidders, selection of a provider, and negotiation. There were multiple issues, including price delivery and form of payment. Postigo was negotiating in the shadow of the possibility that the Kenyan government would start selling subsidized fertilizer to small farmers.

Brett, Jeanne, Lauren Pilcher and Lara Christina Sell. 2011. A New Approach to China: Google and Censorship in the Chinese Market. Case 5-211-255 (KEL590).

The first across-the-table negotiation between Google and China concluded successfully in 2006, when Google received a license to establish a local domain (google.cn) targeted at Chinese Internet users and not subject to the “Great Firewall”. During these negotiations both Google and the Chinese government struggled to reach an outcome that would be acceptable to their constituents. Google was caught between pleasing its shareholders and preserving its reputation for free access to information, while China was balancing the desire for cutting-edge search technology and the concern that liberal access to information would undermine its political-economic model. In the end, the negotiation resulted in Google operating two domains in China: Google.com and Google.cn. On the .cn website, Google complied with Chinese legislation through self-censoring. Google’s search market share in China grew to about 36 percent at the end of 2009.
In early 2010, Google announced that its corporate infrastructure had been the target of a series of China-based cyber attacks and accused the Chinese government of attempting to further limit free speech on the web. These incidents led to a public conflict and private negotiations between Google and the Chinese government, which culminated in July 2010 when the Chinese government renewed the google.cn license knowing that Google was redirecting all Chinese customers search to its google.hk.com site This case concerns the changes in Google and the Chinese government’s environment that led to Google withdrawing services from google.cn and the Chinese government saving face by renewing the google.cn license.
Students will learn that across-the-table negotiations are often preceded by internal negotiations, based on conflicting interests within one party. The case is based on the publicly reported events surrounding two series of negotiations between the U.S. technology giant Google and the Chinese Government regarding Google’s license in China.

Brett, Jeanne and Christopher D Grogan. 2006. Google and the Government of China: A Case Study in Cross-Cultural Negotiations. Case 5-406-752 (KEL242).

This case is based on the negotiation between Google and the Chinese government to allow access by Chinese citizens to a high-speed Chinese version of the Google search engine. In order to reach agreement with the Chinese government, Google had to agree to allow the government to censor access to some sites turned up by Google’s search engine. In agreeing, Google compromised its open access policy. There were inquiries into the agreement by the U.S. Congress and some outcry from U.S. citizens.

The learning objectives of the case include:
(1) Learning how to analyze a negotiation from the perspectives of each of the parties when one party is a government and the other a private-sector organization. What motivates each party to come to the negotiation table and to reach an agreement? A subpoint here is the difference between short-term and longer-term interests.
(2) Addressing the difficulties of balancing business ethics and financial objectives. What does it mean to be ethical in a for-profit business environment? At what point do ethical considerations outweigh financial ones? How do you make those choices? Are there creative ways to get around ethical situations?
(3) Understanding the long-term effects of short-term actions. Was Google’s subsequent action to notify its Chinese users whenever their searches had been filtered, which apparently came as a surprise to the Chinese government, ethical? Wise? What are the long-term implications of causing a party to lose face?

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Degrees MBA, Thunderbird School of Global Management Areas of Expertise Alternative Investments Institutional Investors Capital Raising Investment Manager Marketing Courses FIN 302 Personal Investing - Summer Professional Associations Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAIA) Association