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Biography

Cranfield School of Management
Senior Lecturer (Information Systems)

Rob Lambert is currently Director of the Cranfield IT Leadership Programme and the Achieving Strategy through Business Process Change programme. He also lectures on both MBA and MSc programmes.

Rob is particularly interested in the role of information systems and business processes in achieving corporate objectives and acts as a consultant to a number of multi-national organisations in the financial, pharmaceuticals and oil industries. Here he focuses, often at board level, on strategy development, successful organisational change and programme governance.

Rob's research focuses on the information competencies required to deliver effective information systems. More recently he has researched and published on the changing role of the CIO.

Background

Prior to joining Cranfield, Rob worked in industry for many years with organisations such as Rank Xerox, Plessey and W H Smith. Whilst in industry Rob was responsible for the management and development of IT functions, particularly focussing upon improving the effectiveness of those functions in terms of creating organisational value.

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