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Learning and Organizational Change

Biography

Learning and Organizational Change
Director, Faculty Support and Doctoral Student Affairs

A graduate of Northwestern's MSLOC program, Megan researched how the practice of improv translates to leadership in the workplace. Since then, she has focused her work on academic and leadership development as Director of Faculty and Doctoral Student Affairs in the School of Education and Social Policy and as a coach and Instructor in Northwestern’s Leadership Certificate program. As a consultant for Business Improvisation, Megan has facilitated improv-based learning interventions related to leadership, sales, change readiness, and communication for a variety of Fortune 500 companies and top MBA programs. Megan has over 12 years of experience coaching, teaching and performing improv in Chicago. She studied improv and writing at The Second City and iO training centers and performs with the veteran group Virgin Daiquiri.

Education

  • 2012 MS, Learning & Organizational Change Northwestern University
  • BA, Environmental Geo-science Boston College

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