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Biography

Kellogg School of Management
Richard M. Paget Professor of Management Policy, Professor of Strategy, Chair of Personnel Committee

Jeroen Swinkels is the Paget Professor of Management Policy in the Strategy Department at the Kellogg School of Management. He joined Kellogg in 2009, after previous positions at Stanford, Kellogg, and the Olin School at Washington University in St. Louis. He received his PhD in 1990 from Princeton, and his undergraduate degree from Queen's University in Canada.

Swinkels' work has looked, among other things, at the question of how much of the value of an MBA can be traced to signaling versus education, how information is aggregated in auction and other market settings, the efficiency of auctions with many players, the design of incentive contracts with minimum wages, the design of procurement auctions when one vendor is preferred to another, and the evolutionary foundations for self control problems. He has been published in journals including Econometrica, the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, and the Review of Financial Studies. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society, an associate editor for Econometrica, and has served on boards including the Journal of Economic Theory and Games and Economic Behavior. He was chair of the economics group at the Olin School for 11 years, and received 16 teaching awards while there. At Kellogg, he has served as department chair, and is currectly the chair of the personnel committee. His primary teaching is of the core strategy course Business Strategy.

Areas of Expertise Contract Theory
Economic Theory
Economics of Organizations
Game Theory
Information Economics

Education PhD, 1990, Economics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

BA (hon.), 1986, Economics, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Academic Positions Richard M. Paget Chair in Management Policy, Department of Management and Strategy, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 2009-present

August A. Busch, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy, John M. Olin School of Business, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis MO, (Also, by courtesy to the Department of Economics after 2006), 1998-2009

Professor of Managerial Economics and Strategy, John M. Olin School of Business, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis MO, 1997-1998

Associate Professor of Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences (tenured), J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 1995-1997

Assistant Professor of Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences, J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 1992-1994

Assistant Professor of Economics, Stanford University, Stanford CA, 1990-1992

Honors and Awards Chairs' Core Course Teaching Award, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, 2010-2011

Economic Theory Fellow, Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory, 2011

Sidney J. Levy Teaching Award, Kellogg School of Management, 1995-1996

Editorial Positions Editorial Board Member, Econometrica, 2005

Editorial Board, Theoretical Economics, 2005-2012

Associate Editor, Journal of Economic Theory, 2003-2009

Education Academic Positions Honors and Awards Editorial Positions

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Cases

Busse, Meghan, Jeroen Swinkels and Greg Merkley. 2011. Enterprise Rent-A-Car. Case 5-311-508 (KEL612).

An industry adage held that “there are two types of rental car companies: those that lose money and Enterprise.” The company that would become Enterprise Rent-A-Car was started in 1957 in St. Louis, Missouri, by Jack Taylor. Taylor set up Enterprise offices in neighborhoods rather than at airports because he believed that Americans would welcome a local option for renting cars when their own vehicles were being repaired. In 2010 Enterprise had more than 6,000 rental locations in the United States and a fleet of 850,000 cars in service. Its parent, Enterprise Holdings (comprising Enterprise, National, and Alamo brands) accounted for nearly half of the car rental market and was more than twice the size of Hertz, the number two competitor. Enterprise’s competitive advantage was the result of the combination of its practices in hiring, training, compensation, organization, customer service, IT, and fleet management, among others.

Busse, MeghanJeroen Swinkels and Greg Merkley. 2011. Enterprise Rent-A-Car. Case 5-311-508 (KEL612).

An industry adage held that “there are two types of rental car companies: those that lose money and Enterprise.” The company that would become Enterprise Rent-A-Car was started in 1957 in St. Louis, Missouri, by Jack Taylor. Taylor set up Enterprise offices in neighborhoods rather than at airports because he believed that Americans would welcome a local option for renting cars when their own vehicles were being repaired. In 2010 Enterprise had more than 6,000 rental locations in the United States and a fleet of 850,000 cars in service. Its parent, Enterprise Holdings (comprising Enterprise, National, and Alamo brands) accounted for nearly half of the car rental market and was more than twice the size of Hertz, the number two competitor. Enterprise’s competitive advantage was the result of the combination of its practices in hiring, training, compensation, organization, customer service, IT, and fleet management, among others.

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