Stanford Graduate School of Business

Managing Teams for Innovation and Success

Available dates

May 31—Jun 5, 2020
6 days
Stanford, California, United States
USD 13000
USD 2166 per day

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About the course

Bring effective team management and innovation to your company with actionable strategies, experiential team-based simulations, and design thinking.

Managing Teams for Innovation and Success takes a strategic, global approach to every aspect of teams: creating, managing, and leading them. Great teams can stimulate creativity and innovation, make an organization more adaptive to market forces, and drive breakthrough results.

Building and developing successful teams is a complex process. Managing Teams for Innovation and Success provides strategies, skills, and hands-on simulations to challenge your assumptions and transform your teams.

In six highly intensive and experiential days, you will work with Stanford GSB faculty to explore evidence-based research and discover the counterintuitive findings of team building. You will learn how to leverage diversity, stimulate engagement, influence others without authority, harness collective intelligence, and implement change. You will use design thinking principles to foster team innovation.

Key Benefits

Develop strategies for building high-performance teams, eliminate obstacles to effective teamwork, and foster team innovation with design thinking.

  • Learn to create, motivate, and lead local, global, and virtual teams.
  • Accelerate team innovation using design thinking principles.
  • Define and communicate manager and team member roles.
  • Learn methodologies to manage the complexities of group dynamics, including decision-making, power, and conflict.

Program Highlights

The Dynamics of Diversity in Teams

Diversity provides tremendous informational and problem-solving advantages in teams, but only if the interactional dynamics of the team don't prevent that potential from being realized. This case discussion will identify the primary impediments to effective information sharing in diverse teams, and how to address those impediments. This will be a continuation of the previous session with discussion of the cases that have been prepared.

Design Thinking to Drive Innovation

These sessions provide a provocative, experiential, and practical approach to leading innovation. The focus is on developing innovators (versus innovations), so your primary work will be to develop your team members’ capacity to innovate.

The first session exposes you to the principles of human-centered design and leads to a conversation about disrupting the managerial status quo, amplifying your organization’s strengths, and addressing some key weaknesses.

In the second session, you’ll use a design thinking framework to tackle a hands-on team innovation challenge from start to finish.

Leveraging Compositional Advantage: Solve the Murder Mystery

Take part in a live simulation that challenges your strategic abilities to leverage teamwork and information sharing to accomplish a stated goal. The team discussions will be captured on video, allowing groups to analyze their own performance during the debriefing session.

Managing Team Interactions: Synergy and Process Loss

In this session, we will use the context of a group decision-making task to explore the ways in which team members can make their voices heard. In addition, we will identify strategies for structuring teams to improve members’ ability to hear and incorporate divergent and minority opinions.

Team Designs: The Big Picture Simulation

In this session you will participate in an organizational simulation in which you will grapple with some of the central challenges of managing groups. Your behavior in the simulation will provide us with data from which derive lessons about the role of leadership and organizational structure in producing effective team work. Come prepared to get your hands dirty, both figuratively and literally.

Who should attend

  • Executives and senior managers who are responsible for the performance of teams, task forces, or autonomous work groups
  • Team leaders or small teams of three or more participants from the same company

Trust the experts

Margaret Ann Neale

Research Statement Margaret Neale’s research focuses primarily on negotiation and team performance. Her work has extended judgment and decision-making research from cognitive psychology to the field of negotiation. In particular, she studies cognitive and social processes that produce departures...

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Hayagreeva Rao

Research Statement Professor Rao studies collective action within organizations and in markets. His research and by implication, his teaching, revolves around scaling up mobilization, innovation, and talent in organizations. Teaching Statement Professor Rao teaches courses on Scaling up Excell...

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Gregory Northcraft

Harry J. Gray Professor of Executive Leadership and Professor of Business Administration Educational Background Ph.D., M.A., Social Psychology, Stanford University, 1981 B.A., Experimental Psychology and Philosophy, Oxford University, 1977 A.B., Psychology, Dartmouth College, 1975. Positions Held...

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Brian Lowery

Research Statement Professor Lowery's research seeks to extend knowledge of individuals' experience of inequality and fairness. His work suggests that individuals distinguish between inequalities framed as advantage as opposed to disadvantage. This finding affects how individuals perceive inequa...

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Managing Teams for Innovation and Success

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