Available dates

May 3—8, 2020
6 days
Stanford, California, United States
USD 13500
USD 2250 per day

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About the course

Act with power, navigate the workplace, and take the lead with new strategies and tactics in this unique women’s leadership program.

Power, influence, persuasion. We pack a lot of learning — lectures and simulations filled with techniques and tactics — into six dynamic days.

Gain insights from Stanford GSB faculty members who make it their business to challenge your assumptions, confront your fears, and turn obstacles into opportunities. And experience it all in the company of other dedicated and daring women, as you create a personal and professional network you can leverage throughout your career.

The Executive Program for Women Leaders uses research to understand the perceptions, behaviors, stereotypes, and backlash that women uniquely face. And then transforms those empirical results into effective strategies and solutions.

The program tackles the issues of negotiation, team effectiveness, power and relationships, social networks, and influence. These are the most critical and complicated issues. These are the essential skills you need — to enhance your power, navigate the workplace, and take the lead.

Key Benefits

Transform the way you negotiate and manage teams, and fundamentally change the way you lead.

  • Develop expertise as a negotiator, and grasp the complicated dynamics of successful negotiation.
  • Enhance team effectiveness by analyzing team composition, leveraging information sharing, and resolving leadership issues.
  • Interpret the subtle messages of power, and recognize and react to the organizational impact of diverse management styles.
  • Learn about and leverage social networks and techniques to influence individuals and groups.
  • Build a strong personal and professional network with peers from various industries and continents who face similar challenges and opportunities.

Program Highlights

Acting With Power

The ability to function effectively within a hierarchy is a crucial component of leadership, yet many women struggle with “authority issues” that make certain hierarchical roles and positions difficult for them. This session draws on the craft of acting and the concepts of psychology, helping you learn how to use them to develop the characters that can play these roles effectively.

Building Alliances

Building strong alliances is critical for today’s leaders, particularly when the formation and implementation of new strategies depend on allies who may not be subordinates and who may even seem like natural adversaries. Ultimately, alliances are based on trust and reciprocity.

Influencing Without Authoring: The One to the Many

Learn the importance of influencing small groups, particularly when you have little or no authority. Analyze effective influence tactics, and develop multiple perspectives on how to gain influence through dynamic interactions with others.

Leadership Communications

As a leader, you spend the majority of your time communicating with others: team members, subordinates, clients, and public constituents.

You probably don’t spend much time thinking about the way you communicate, nor are you likely, in the corporate setting, to get honest feedback on the messages you send. Yet the quality of your communications largely determines your effectiveness.

This session will help you appreciate the nature and complexity of communication and provide guidelines for both improving your own communication style and recognizing the unique styles of others.

Neuroscience and the Connection to Exemplary Leadership

The exponential growth in our understanding of the workings of the human brain has led to a rather startling and maybe embarrassing (even depressing) conclusion.

While the human brain is unique among species in its ability to strategize, conceptualize, hypothesize, memorize, etc., it is now undeniable that most human decisions are shaped by nonconscious instinctual neural systems and processes.

In these two sessions, you will first gain an understanding of the workings of the instinctual brain and then leverage that understanding to be exemplary leaders — to be more effective at making decisions and influencing others’ (e.g., key stakeholders’) decisions.

Minimizing Gender Bias in the Workplace

In this session, we will strategize about how to create workplaces where all people — women and men — can thrive. The main focus will be on reducing gender biases that can undermine women’s achievement and limit their advancement.

We will also provide an overview of the research on the way that biases emerge and describe what the consequences are for women and for their workplaces. We will provide strategies for minimizing or eliminating these biases.

You will be invited to share your own experiences and to describe the approaches your workplaces have taken to advance women. You should leave the session with research-informed strategies for creating fair and effective workplaces.

Who should attend

  • Senior female leaders with eight to 12 years of experience in a leadership role
  • Executives and functional managers who aspire to positions of greater influence and authority in their organizations
  • Those identified as high-potential talent by their organizations
  • Mid- and senior-level managers who lead teams or have direct reports
  • Entrepreneurs and business owners
  • Participants of all genders who are interested in advancing executive women leadership in business

Trust the experts

Francis Flynn

Research Statement Professor Flynn’s research focuses on three topics of interest: (1) How employees can develop healthy patterns of cooperation; (2) How the negative impact of racial and gender stereotyping in the workplace can be mitigated; and (3) How people can emerge as leaders and assume p...

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Deborah Gruenfeld

Research Statement Deborah H Gruenfeld is a social psychologist whose research and teaching examine how people are transformed by the organizations and social structures in which they work. The author of numerous articles on the psychology of power, and on group behavior, Professor Gruenfeld has...

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Margaret Ann Neale

Research Statement Margaret Neale’s research focuses primarily on negotiation and team performance. Her work has extended judgment and decision-making research from cognitive psychology to the field of negotiation. In particular, she studies cognitive and social processes that produce departures...

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Shelley Correll

Bio Shelley Correll is professor of sociology and (by courtesy) organizational behavior at Stanford University. She is also the Barbara D. Finberg Director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research and the founding director of the Center for the Advancement of Women’s Leadership. Professor Co...

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Baba Shiv

Research Statement Baba Shiv's research expertise is in the area of neuroeconomics, with specific emphasis on the role of neural structures related to emotion and motivation in shaping decisions and experiences. His recent work examines the interplay of the brain’s "liking" and "wanting" systems...

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Course reviews

Executive Program in Women's Leadership

Executive Program in Leadership (EPL) - Short

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